An anonymous survey of mindfulness, self-compassion, wellbeing and mental health.


Study ID: 32191
Short Title: An anonymous survey of mindfulness, self-compassion, wellbeing and mental health.
Organisation: Southern Health NHS Foundation Trust
Location: Southern Health NHS Foundation Trust
Condition: Mental Health
Main Specialty: Mental Health
Expected End Date: 31/12/2017
Postcode: SO30 3JB
Contact Name: SHFT Research
Contact Email: research@southernhealth.nhs.uk
Active: Yes

Inclusion Criteria

Inclusion criteria are: • Adults aged 18+ • Assessed and offered (low or high intensity) treatment in IAPT. • Be able to read and communicate in English

Exclusion Criteria

-Below 18 years of age -Those not being assessed and offered (low or high intensity) treatment in IAPT. -Those not able to read and communicate in English

Study summary:

Research into mindfulness and self-compassion has grown steadily over the last few decades. Studies have demonstrated a positive association of mindfulness and self-compassion with wellbeing and a negative association with mental health difficulties such as depression, anxiety and stress. Clinical research has established that mindfulness-based interventions (MBI) are beneficial for common mental health difficulties such as depression, anxiety and stress and achieve these positive effects by improving mindfulness and self-compassion skills and reducing worry, rumination, cognitive and emotional reactivity. Whilst this research is relatively well-established, there is a dearth of research on the association of mindfulness and self-compassion with symptoms of obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). Also, despite there being a plausible theoretical premise for the potential benefits of MBI for OCD, clinical research into MBI for OCD is still in its infancy. Given the important gaps in the literature, this study aims to examine the relationship of mindfulness and self-compassion with OCD symptoms, OCD-related beliefs and distress tolerance. Also, it aims to examine whether (aspects of) mindfulness and self-compassion are lower in OCD compared to depression and/or anxiety and non-clinical controls, and whether the relationship of distress tolerance and OCD-related beliefs with OCD symptoms is mediated by of mindfulness and self-compassion. To do this, a survey will be distributed to adults who have been offered treatment in primary care and to adults from a community sample. Findings will be used to enhance our understanding of the relationship of mindfulness and self-compassion with OCD and the obsessive beliefs and difficulties with distress tolerance that are thought to maintain OCD.


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