Genetic Research into Childhood Onset Psychosis


Study ID: 18812
Short Title: Genetic Research into Childhood Onset Psychosis
Organisation: Dorset Healthcare University NHS Foundation Trust
Location: Dorset Healthcare University NHS Foundation Trust
Condition: Psychosis
Main Specialty: Mental Health
Expected End Date: 31/10/2020
Postcode: BH1 4JQ
Contact Name: DHUFT Research & Development
Contact Email: dhc.research&development@nhs.net
Active: Yes

Inclusion Criteria

 


1. Participant is competent and willing and able to give informed consent for participation in the study, or in the case of younger participants assent with parental consent.


2. Aged 5-30 years.


3. Diagnosed with an idiopathic psychotic illness according to DSM-V criteria on or before the age of 13. Siblings: 1) Full or half siblings of probands. 2) Participant is competent and willing and able to give informed consent for participation in the study, or in the case of younger participants assent with parental consent. 3) Aged over 5 years. 4) If no psychiatric diagnosis, aged over 13 years. Parents: All biological parents will be included.

Exclusion Criteria

1. A significant history of prematurity (birth weight < 1500g).


2. A history of brain injury including hypoxia, CNS infection, accident, toxin, etc.


3. A genetic condition that is known or strongly suspected to explain the observed psychiatric symptoms.


4. A history of severe physical or mental abuse.


5. A significant history of substance abuse prior to diagnosis. Parents and Siblings: No exclusion criteria

Study summary:

This study is designed to investigate genes undferlying childhood onset psychosis. We are recruiting children or adults that have had a diagnosis of a psychotic illness at age 13 or younger. The patients, parents and siblings will be invoted to take part. Participation involves giving a saliva sample, and and taking part in an interview on health and family history of mental illness (parents) or a cognitive test and a psychiatric interview (probands and siblings). As the condition is very rare, we expect each site to identify only a single patient, though a few might have more.


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